Seeking approval:
“Why doesn’t my father appreciate me and all that I have accomplished?”

"Bicicletas para Alquilar" by Mimi Stuart © Live the Life you Desire

“Bicicletas para Alquilar” by Mimi Stuart ©
Live the Life you Desire

In the presence of close family members we sometimes revert back to being a child. We may still crave the approval that we feel we never felt we received.

Yet the trouble with seeking approval is threefold:

1. The approval we seek may be sought from someone who is incapable of giving it.

2. The more we yearn for that outside approval, the less likely we are to receive it. Often people who are reluctant to give approval are negatively triggered by those who yearn for it.

3. By the time we are adults, the disapproval we sense has become internalized. Therefore, we have to generate the approval we seek within ourselves rather than seeking it from others.

Even if your father finally sees the light and says, “You are amazing! I’m so proud of you,” you will probably not feel that magical feeling of self-worth you’ve desired for so long. By the time you’re an adult, the feeling of inadequacy stems from your internalized father—that internal negative voice that has been with you so long.

Transforming the internal voice

Now it is up to you to transform the voice in your head. This may be as difficult as transforming your real father. However, it’s a relief to know that we actually have considerable control over our own thinking.

We can develop new habits of thinking and thereby create that sought-after approval or desired harmony. You need to catch yourself every time you have a negative thought and replace it with a positive one.

For instance, when you hear an inner voice saying, “You’ll probably botch your interview,” replace it with, “I will prepare for this interview as well as I can.” When you say to yourself, “I’m the dumbest person here,” with “Nobody here is perfect; I’ll just do my best.” After fifty or a hundred thought replacements, each successive one becomes easier. After a few hundred or thousand replacements, your habit will have changed.

Or replace the thought, “I’m never good enough for him to appreciate me,” with a more positive thought: “Too bad for him that he isn’t able to show appreciation, but I know I did a good job.” After many such replacements, more constructive thinking will come automatically and you will no longer crave that approval from the outside.

by Alison Poulsen, PhD

Read “Feeling Shame: ‘I’m not worthy to be loved.’”

Read “Rebuilding your Life: ‘How do I silence their abusive voices in my head, stop being hard on myself and start living?’”

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